Using Multiple Ethernet Cards with WebTen


Introduction

WebTen can support multiple simultaneous Ethernet cards in a single Macintosh as long as the Ethernet interfaces are supported by and are operational with MacOS. The following procedure can appear technical for the novice, but if the instructions here are followed closely, it is not deficult to achieve success with these instructions.

Ethernet cards (NICs) and MacOS support

The first step to using Multiple ethernet interfaces in a single Macintosh is to install the interface and the appropriate drivers.

In the past, Asante 10/100 drivers did not support multiple cards in the same machine. We went all the way to Asante Engineering with this and we were never able to make two work ehternet cards work at the same time. it is also imperative that you make sure that you have the latest driver versions as well.

We have had problems with some Kingston drivers as well. If you cannot get a Kingston card to work with these instructions, we have a workaround. Please contact our support department for details.

Configuring Open Transport

Once you have the NICs installed, you must convince Open Transport to use them to test that the cards operate properly. You can do this by opening up the TCP/IP control panel. Verify that the "Connect via:" pulldown lists the number of cards that are installed in your computer. Your Ethernet interfaces will be differentiated by slot numbers "E1", "E2", etc. If your Ethernet interfaces do not show up properly in the "Connect via:" pulldown, either the Extension is not installed properly or your card is not functioning properly.

WebTen configuration choices

At this point, you need to decide how you want these interfaces to work with WebTen. The easiest choice is to run WebTen in "dual stack" mode on your built-in Ethernet interface and run Open Transport on the secondary Ethernet interface. You will need two IP addresses for this configuration. See the Dual Stack Paper for more information.

With this set-up WebTen will only respond to requests on the built-in Ethernet interface while Open Transport will respond on the second Ethernet interface.

Another easy choice is to user three IP addresses and run WebTen in "dual stack" mode on both cards. See the Dual Stack Paper for more information. In this configuration, one IP address is assigned to Open Transport on the first interface, another IP address is asssigned to the Tenon stack on the first interface, and the third IP address is assigned to Tenon stack on the second interface.

Under this configuration, WebTen would listen and respond to requests coming from either IP address. This may be desirable if you have multiple connections ot the Internet, or if your web server must serve requests for multiple networks.

Another and more widely preferred method requires only two IP addresses. This method requires that one IP address be used for Open Transport on the built-in (or first) Ethernet interface, and a second IP address be assigned to the added (or second) Ethernet interface.

Under this configuration, WebTen would listen and respond to requests only from the second ethernet interface. This is a more usual configuration requiring only a few additional steps to set up.

Option 1: Easiest configuration requiring two IP addresses

To properly set up Open Transport, you must select the added (or second) interface in your TCP/IP control panel using the "Connect to:" pulldown. Enter the IP address that you want to use for Open Transport and save the settings. Make sure that DNS IP address, "Search Domains", and Router address fields are filled out. You also must make sure that you are, in fact, running in "dual stack mode". This is done by moving "Mactcpdlib" into the disabled folder from the WebTen libraries folder. I would recommend doing this now so that you don't forget when the time comes to start WebTen.

Next, start up WebTen while holding down the "command" and "option" keys to force the preferences dialog to appear. In this dialog box, check the "Replace Open Transport" checkbox and enter the second IP address that you have available (in this case, it is "192.168.0.4"). This IP address will be assigned to the Tenon stack on the first (built-in) ethernet interface. Make sure that the Gateway address (same as the Router address in the TCP/IP control panel), and the DNS IP address fields are filled out as well as the host name and domain name fields. When you choose to save the settings, WebTen will start up.

That should do it. WebTen will use the built-in interface by default with no additional configuration. The other two set-ups take advantage of the settings in WebTen's advanced networking stack to run on the secondary card.

Steps common to both configuration setups

To properly set up Open Transport, you must select the first (or built-in) interface in your TCP/IP control panel using the "Connect to:" pulldown. Enter the IP address that you want to use for Open Transport and save the settings. Make sure that DNS IP address, "Search Domains", and Router address fields are filled out. You also must make sure that you are, in fact, running in "dual stack mode". This is done by moving "Mactcpdlib" into the disabled folder from the WebTen libraries folder. I would recommend doing this now so that you don't forget when the time comes to start WebTen.

Option 2: Easy configuration requiring three IP addresses

Say the three IP addresses assigned to your machine are:
192.168.0.3Open Transport IP address (first ethernet interface)
192.168.0.4Tenon stack IP address (first ethernet interface)
192.168.0.5Tenon stack IP address (second ethernet interface)

You would have entered "192.168.0.3" into your TCP/IP control panel.

The first step is to edit the rc.local file located in the "tenon:etc" folder inside of the WebTen folder. Make sure to edit the rc.local file with a text editor that understands Unix line feeds such as BBEdit.

You will notice near the top of this file that there are lines that look like:

#ADDR_INFO_1="hostname"
#NETMASK_1="netmask 0xffffff00"
#IFCONFIG_ie1=$ADDRINFO $NETMASK_1 up"

Based on the information given above, you could adjust these lines to look like this:

ADDR_INFO_1="192.168.0.5"
NETMASK_1="netmask 0xffffff00"
IFCONFIG_ie1=$ADDRINFO $NETMASK_1 up"

Note the lack of the "#". This means that the lines are now uncommented and activated. Save the changes and quit your editor.

Next, start up WebTen while holding down the "command" and "option" keys to force the preferences dialog to appear. In this dialog box, check the "Replace Open Transport" checkbox and enter the second IP address that you have available (in this case, it is "192.168.0.4"). This IP address will be assigned to the Tenon stack on the first ethernet interface. Make sure that the Gateway address (same as the Router address in the TCP/IP control panel), and the DNS IP address fields are filled out as well as the host name and domain name fields. When you choose to save the settings, WebTen will start up.

Option 3: Slightly more difficult configuration requiring two IP addresses

Say the three IP addresses assigned to your machine are:
192.168.0.3Open Transport IP address (first ethernet interface)
192.168.0.4Tenon stack IP address (second ethernet interface)

You would have entered "192.168.0.3" into your TCP/IP control panel.

The first step is to edit the rc.local file located in the "tenon:etc" folder inside of the WebTen folder. Make sure to edit the rc.local file with a text editor that understands Unix line feeds such as BBEdit.

You will notice near the top of this file that there are lines that look like:

#ADDR_INFO_1="hostname"
#NETMASK_1="netmask 0xffffff00"
#IFCONFIG_ie1=$ADDRINFO $NETMASK_1 up"

Based on the information given above, you could adjust these lines to look like this:

/sbin/ifconfig ie0 down
ADDR_INFO_1="192.168.0.4"
NETMASK_1="netmask 0xffffff00"
IFCONFIG_ie1=$ADDRINFO $NETMASK_1 up"

Note the lack of the "#". This means that the lines are now uncommented and activated. The line "/sbin/ifconfig ie0 down" will instruct WebTen to stop using the first ethernet interface (the one that you have set aside for use by Open Transport) as it starts up. Save the changes and quit your editor.

Next, start up WebTen while holding down the "command" and "option" keys to force the preferences dialog to appear. In this dialog box, check the "Replace Open Transport" checkbox and enter the Open Transport IP address (192.168.0.3) in the "ie0" field. This entry serves only as a placeholder so that WebTen doesn't complain. This address is actually not used as the "/sbin/ifconfig ie0 down" tells WebTen to stop using it. Make sure that the Gateway address (same as the Router address in the TCP/IP control panel), and the DNS IP address fields are filled out as well as the host name and domain name fields. When you choose to save the settings, WebTen will start up.

Post configuration checkup

After you have made these configuration changes, you must check to make sure that everything is operational. Make sure that the "System Status" window in the WebTen application indicates that the proper interfaces are configured. I often find it helpful to open the shell window available in WebTen 3.0 and type the following command: "netstat -in". This will list the valid configured interfaces.

Make sure that the interfaces listed match what you would expect based on the configuration choice that you made above.

Important note

It is important to note that the admin server only knows about the first ethernet interface. You will have to make special adjustments if you plan on adding IP-based virtual hosts with the admin server. You will have to manually edit the "tenon:etc:rc.local" file and change the lines that look like:

/sbin/ifconfig ie0 192.168.0.6

To:

/sbin/ifconfig ie1 192.168.0.6

If you want WebTen to listen on the second interface instead of the first one.

Conclusion

If you have any difficulties, questions, or comments, please contact Tenon Technical Support.


Page last updated 2/25/2000

http://www.tenon.com/support/webten/papers/webten-multi-ethernet.html

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